WORLD PRESS

MUNFW 2019

A Common Humanity: Back to the Principles of the UN Charter

April 14, 2019

Volume 69, Issue 7

Freedom of Press?

More like Scrutiny of Subpar Memes.

Earlier this afternoon the co-editors of the MUNFW World Press, Abigail Reed and Raffaela Mueller were called in to the Security Council due to a grave concern among delegates involving breach of security. Concerns began to accumulate after one delegate noticed a live tweet thread on their remarks during a high level crisis. During the opening statement from the World Press, it was made clear that they [World Press] believe this is a freedom of the press issue as opposed to one of security; it was blatantly identifiable they were members of the press during this time.

Almost instantaneously after the Press yielded the rest of their time to the chair, placards were raised. Among the first comments made was one from the United States on how the social media page has been issuing “Fake News,” and recommended that the World Press follow their President’s account for “tips.” The World Press would like it to be known that they only report the facts. All quotes on the social media page, as well as in daily issues, are accurate and not written out of context. At one point, a delegate of the Security Council stated this breach of security could cause un-do harm, to which the World Press was unamused. In their response, the co-editors stated that the content on their page is put there purposely to keep the public informed. The World Press stresses they have done no wrong in this situation. As noted in the posts, the thread in question was created because the press felt the reaction from SC lacked the urgency it required, and the public needed to be informed.

The delegate from Sweden decided this was the perfect moment to compare this organization to that of other media outlets that include, “Fake news, tweeters, and sub-par memes.” While not stated initially, the World Press would like it to be known that they are deeply offended by this accusation. The images used were given great time and consideration before being added to their page. Following this rather strong accusation, other delegates followed suite and nitpicked various posts made by the organization. It seemed that at this point, the delegates were getting off topic, drawing in irrelevant facts to divert from the actual issue at hand.

This raises the question, why was the World Press really called into the Security Council. Did the delegates truly believe this was a breach in security? Or were they simply upset with the memes used in relation to their comments.

ATTENTION: WE INTERRUPT YOUR REGULARLY PLANNED PROGRAM WITH INFORMATION ABOUT THE FANTASTIC REPORTERS FROM WORLD PRESS.

You may have noticed over the past few days that there were reporters lurking in the shadows, finding the big stories, and reporting on them by the hour. We want to give you all a chance to get to know a little bit more about these amazing people before the conference is over!

 

Q: Where are you from and why did you decide to attend this conference?

Dixon: I’m from Hemet, California and am a third-year at Whittier College. We are hosting next year, and I will be Editor of World Press, so I came this year to see how it runs!

Griffith: I am from Texas Tech University and I came to this conference because I had always wanted to attend a Model UN conference in high school, but never got the chance, so I decided to come check things out at this conference.

Dowler: I’m from Western Oregon University, and wanted to attend this conference because I believed that it would be more challenging than conferences I had attended previously.

Adi: I’m from Texas Tech University. I chose this conference because it was a different conference from what I have attended in the past.

Hurley: I am from Sacramento California, studying political science and international relations at Cosumnes River College. I was accepted to sf state for transfer in the fall. Immigration and policies around immigration are very important to the economy and I would like to see things progress for the rights of everyone not just citizens.

Q: What has been your favorite topic and/or committee to cover so far at this conference?

Dixon: My favorite committee to attend so far has been the General Assembly during their high level event. It was really impressive to see all the delegates adapt so quickly to a topic they had not prepared for, in addition to reaching a group consensus.

Griffith: My favorite issue so far has to be the issue of Myanmar that the Security Council had discussed earlier in the conference, I am a Sociology student and I have always found the issues of migration based on war and social conflict to be a fascinating and important part of our interactions and discussions with each other as human beings.

Dowler: While every committee is interesting in their own ways, the drama and theatrics centered around GAs sexual rights topic is awe inspiring.

Adi: HRC and the topic of addressing lesser known issues.

Hurley: My favorite part has been the issues themselves and how diplomatic majority of the delegate behaved with

Q: What is a fun fact about you?

Dixon: A fun fact about me is that I am the Managing Editor of my college’s newspaper.

Griffith: I tell way too many dad jokes, here’s my favorite one so far: When is the best to to go to the dentist? Tooth-hurty!

Dowler: I enjoy my very little spare time binge watching TV with my pug, Mr. Muggles.

Adi: I was born in Kenya.

Hurley: I am currently known as a political artist. I have done the covers to my community college political magazine, Globus Mundi, as well as writing an article on illegal immigration on page 69.

Experiences at the Model United Nations of the Far West are unique for everyone who participates. Although a group collectively represents one nation state, each delegate has personalized experiences, and the most important of these is which issue they find most important. Each delegate present, whether this is their first or fifth conference, has their own unique take on how to solve these issues. Returning delegates are very fond of the Model United Nations of the Far West. Most delegates are passionate about their topics and typically have one or more issues which resonate with them on a personal level.

The Human Rights Council faces some of the most controversial and contemporary issues in our world today. The Republic of Australia, represented by American River College, worked aggressively to resolve South African human rights violations within their region. The focus on countries in crisis was prominent, as these human rights violations are continued to be covered up. For the delegation of Australia, the debate centered around investigative missions and to encourage South Africa to answer for violations; this included providing more resources and support.

Within the same committee, the French Republic, represented by Cosumnes River College, focused on another under-addressed issue: the famine in Yemen. There are other issues of concern within Yemen that are stressed to be recognized, such as the case of recruiting child soldiers into the Yemeni military. But, the topic that was of greatest interest was the famine crisis that has not been resolved. The French Republic has considered aiding Yemen’s governing body with cash aid through the means of NGOs. Concerns of corruption plagued aid and funding that is processed through third party organizations. On the final day of conference, the French Republic stressed upon addressing the lesser known issue of LGBT rights, and was successful with Yemen signing onto the resolution.

Issues segway into one another through recognition in multiple committees. One example was through the High Commissioner for Refugees and how religion affects the rights of citizens’ livelihoods. The Central African Republic, leaned heavily on combating xenophobia, racism, and the perspective on isolating those labeled as “other”. There is a major concern of religion having a role in Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and the acts of ethnic cleansing. Central African Republic proposed to create more educational programs and lesson the euro-centrist perspective of western education. This would also bring more weight to the use of social media and global connections.

The Republic of Poland of the High Commission for Refugees also saw xenophobia as an issue but primarily at borders. Another issue was the increase in immigrants of different religious backgrounds, which has disrupted Poland’s nationalized religion of Christianity. To address the issue of racism and discrimination of the “other”, Poland would like to propose integration camps that enhance immigrant education and maintaining the sovereignty of the nation. The Republic of Poland understands the necessity of immigrants as a workforce and enhancing the economy, but will keep in mind what is necessary for peace and structure for the nation.

Third Committee they had topics including Women’s Empowerment. The delegate of the Republic of Australia there did surmountable work to move forward on women’s empowerment. Australia is particularly focused on raising levels of education in rural areas.

The Development committee had the most success in reaching resolutions for all their issues that were given. Interviewing the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, who are from Humboldt State University, have been in momentum of achieving SDG one of Abolishing Poverty, the resolution that was drafted by the DPRK was ultimately denied due to strong wording.

The Democratic People’s Republic of China, participating in the Development Committee, had interests around western states control over developing countries as to give them more capabilities to have more support through neighboring countries. This will include welfare and construction and trading routes to give more accessibility. This is in prospect of having better trade within Africa and build better connections with Laos and Cambodia.

The United Nations Environment Assembly focused on the issues of ocean resources and the reduction of product due to higher acidification. This is topic had been a leading issue on Chile, since food shortage, especially oceanic resources, affects coastal poverty. Chile has dialogue with the delegate of the French Republic to address Air Pollution Sustainability.

The General Assembly had subject matters pertaining to social stability in communities. The Republic of Indonesia, participating from the University of Nevada, discussed media rights in connection with more representation. The country of Indonesia nationalized the Islamic idealism and is very traditionalist in their structure. The Republic of Indonesia has a long standing tradition that involves Female Genital Mutilation. The have intentions of legalizing the act under the contingency of safety and professional practice. The Republic of Indonesia stressed the connection between  abortion in the West, where focus is often on improving the practice to insure hygiene and safety.

Finally, in the Security Council, the delegate from the French Republic has been a strong member of the committee and has been recognized many times for maintaining position and working towards peace. The subject of Cyber Security unanimously passed today. It focused on Cyber Terrorism as well as Cyber Warfare. It was agreed that financial aid and improvement of transportation will help lessen the consequence of cyber attacks as nations will have more substantial connections to maintain sustainability within their communities. Terrorist organizations are unable to form securely if their communities are not being supported.

In conclusion to all the individual experiences and passions that the delegates had, many committees stayed in character, worked with allies, communicated their issues, and came to substantial resolutions. Hard work has left many drained, but fulfilled. At the end of the day, countries and individuals coming together to create a more structured world for growth and peace. Model United Nations of the Far West has given opportunities to students who are passionate about the effects of the world and believe in change leading to a better future. All delegates should be proud of the work that they have done here.

The MUNFW Experience

By: Corey Hurley, French Republic

Experiences at the Model United Nations of the Far West are unique for everyone who participates. Although a group collectively represents one nation state, each delegate has personalized experiences, and the most important of these is which issue they find most important. Each delegate present, whether this is their first or fifth conference, has their own unique take on how to solve these issues. Returning delegates are very fond of the Model United Nations of the Far West. Most delegates are passionate about their topics and typically have one or more issues which resonate with them on a personal level.

The Human Rights Council faces some of the most controversial and contemporary issues in our world today. The Republic of Australia, represented by American River College, worked aggressively to resolve South African human rights violations within their region. The focus on countries in crisis was prominent, as these human rights violations are continued to be covered up. For the delegation of Australia, the debate centered around investigative missions and to encourage South Africa to answer for violations; this included providing more resources and support.

Within the same committee, the French Republic, represented by Cosumnes River College, focused on another under-addressed issue: the famine in Yemen. There are other issues of concern within Yemen that are stressed to be recognized, such as the case of recruiting child soldiers into the Yemeni military. But, the topic that was of greatest interest was the famine crisis that has not been resolved. The French Republic has considered aiding Yemen’s governing body with cash aid through the means of NGOs. Concerns of corruption plagued aid and funding that is processed through third party organizations. On the final day of conference, the French Republic stressed upon addressing the lesser known issue of LGBT rights, and was successful with Yemen signing onto the resolution.

Issues segway into one another through recognition in multiple committees. One example was through the High Commissioner for Refugees and how religion affects the rights of citizens’ livelihoods. The Central African Republic, leaned heavily on combating xenophobia, racism, and the perspective on isolating those labeled as “other”. There is a major concern of religion having a role in Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and the acts of ethnic cleansing. Central African Republic proposed to create more educational programs and lesson the euro-centrist perspective of western education. This would also bring more weight to the use of social media and global connections.

The Republic of Poland of the High Commission for Refugees also saw xenophobia as an issue but primarily at borders. Another issue was the increase in immigrants of different religious backgrounds, which has disrupted Poland’s nationalized religion of Christianity. To address the issue of racism and discrimination of the “other”, Poland would like to propose integration camps that enhance immigrant education and maintaining the sovereignty of the nation. The Republic of Poland understands the necessity of immigrants as a workforce and enhancing the economy, but will keep in mind what is necessary for peace and structure for the nation.

Third Committee they had topics including Women’s Empowerment. The delegate of the Republic of Australia there did surmountable work to move forward on women’s empowerment. Australia is particularly focused on raising levels of education in rural areas.

The Development committee had the most success in reaching resolutions for all their issues that were given. Interviewing the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, who are from Humboldt State University, have been in momentum of achieving SDG one of Abolishing Poverty, the resolution that was drafted by the DPRK was ultimately denied due to strong wording.

The Democratic People’s Republic of China, participating in the Development Committee, had interests around western states control over developing countries as to give them more capabilities to have more support through neighboring countries. This will include welfare and construction and trading routes to give more accessibility. This is in prospect of having better trade within Africa and build better connections with Laos and Cambodia.

The United Nations Environment Assembly focused on the issues of ocean resources and the reduction of product due to higher acidification. This is topic had been a leading issue on Chile, since food shortage, especially oceanic resources, affects coastal poverty. Chile has dialogue with the delegate of the French Republic to address Air Pollution Sustainability.

The General Assembly had subject matters pertaining to social stability in communities. The Republic of Indonesia, participating from the University of Nevada, discussed media rights in connection with more representation. The country of Indonesia nationalized the Islamic idealism and is very traditionalist in their structure. The Republic of Indonesia has a long standing tradition that involves Female Genital Mutilation. The have intentions of legalizing the act under the contingency of safety and professional practice. The Republic of Indonesia stressed the connection between  abortion in the West, where focus is often on improving the practice to insure hygiene and safety.

Finally, in the Security Council, the delegate from the French Republic has been a strong member of the committee and has been recognized many times for maintaining position and working towards peace. The subject of Cyber Security unanimously passed today. It focused on Cyber Terrorism as well as Cyber Warfare. It was agreed that financial aid and improvement of transportation will help lessen the consequence of cyber attacks as nations will have more substantial connections to maintain sustainability within their communities. Terrorist organizations are unable to form securely if their communities are not being supported.

In conclusion to all the individual experiences and passions that the delegates had, many committees stayed in character, worked with allies, communicated their issues, and came to substantial resolutions. Hard work has left many drained, but fulfilled. At the end of the day, countries and individuals coming together to create a more structured world for growth and peace. Model United Nations of the Far West has given opportunities to students who are passionate about the effects of the world and believe in change leading to a better future. All delegates should be proud of the work that they have done here.

General Assembly Crisis

By: Autumn Dixon, Finland

The General Assembly (GA) was informed by the Under-Secretary-General of an attack on multiple European water treatment facilities by a Russian cyber terrorist group named Fancy Bear. After learning of the increased hospital admittances and overall threat to cyber security, delegates of the GA got to work on creating a consensus resolution.

The GA broke into blocs based on regions and began their work. After many meetings and a little bit of tension from the Republic of Korea, a resolution was passed. Some of the points made in the resolution include:

    • Cognizant of the deep suffering and misfortune of the cure set and nations affected by this attack, understanding clean water is a human right, one that is frequently inaccessible to developing countries.
    • Deeply disturbed by the potential reach and scope of cyber warfare into all aspect of life and security, with specific empathy on nations whose security infrastructure is still in development and this exceptionally susceptible, while mindful that the proliferation of competent infrastructure systems are not equal throughout the world stage, and nothing the vast inequality between various member states and their individual access to water treatment capabilities.

 

  • Requests that developed nations offer support to underdeveloped nations in regards to cyber security to better strengthen technological infrastructure through Information and Communication Technology and advises that member states invest in private sector technological expansions.

 

With the passing of this resolution, the GA has since moved back into their agreed upon agenda topics, giving speeches on Elaborating on Sexual Rights in the 21st Century.

The Issue of Sovereignty

Autumn Dixon, Finland

Tensions broke out in the General Assembly (GA) this afternoon while delegates discussed their second agenda topic, Elaborating on Sexual Rights in the 21st Century. A delegate from Indonesia stated that the country does not believe in outlawing Female Genital Mutilations (FGM), just the unsafe practices of in a speech to the body. The delegate from China rose to argue this point, while Indonesia rebutted by saying that the state stands in its sovereignty, and does not wish to have another country tell them how to govern their people. In response to this comment from Indonesia, the delegate from Israel stood to state that women’s human rights are more important that the state’s sovereignty.

“Although the language used by my fellow delegate may have been perceived as coarse, Indonesia firmly believes in not compromising our people’s wishes and cultures by criminalizing a ritual that is important to our people’s religion and culture,” stated one of the delegates from Indonesia. “From an empirical perspective, FGM is highly dangerous,” commented the delegate from Israel. “I spoke about the health hazards of FGM, and how it leads to severe pain, viral infections, urination infection, PTSD, etc.”

For more on tensions within the GA, see “Tensions in the General Assembly.”

Tensions in the General Assembly

By: Taylor Dowler, Haiti

Tensions remain high in the General Assembly as the delegates dive deeper into their topic of Sexual Rights in the 21st Century. The delegate of Russia was one of the very first speakers on Monday morning, and used her time to vocalize Russia’s adamant opposition to FGM, child marriage, and also noted the decriminalization of homosexuality by Russia in 1993. After being questioned further by delegates about honor killings of members of the LGBTQ community, Mexico rose under a P23 in an effort to remind the body that there is nary a Member State who hasn’t been guilty of undermining women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, or both. During an unmoderated caucus, the delegate elaborated further to say that it may feel good to call out fellow Member States on past issues, but that doing so is ultimately unproductive. Mexico’s sentiments were largely ignored.

As the unmoderated caucus continued, three main blocs emerged. The European bloc, which included delegates from Israel, Denmark, and France, has narrowed the focus of their working paper down to three main points. The delegates are vehemently opposed to FGM and child marriage, and drafting strong clauses in the pursuit of ending these practices. Also included in their working paper are statements of vigorous support of the LGBTQ community. The EU block was also adamant that there be no mention of sovereignty within their working paper. The Asian/African bloc, including Kuwait, Japan, and Russia, is working on a document condemning FGM as its main focus. The delegates make no mention of LGBTQ issues in the creation of this document. Japan and other Member States have also offered to fund education programs in nations where FGM is practiced, hoping these programs will lead to a drop in these procedures. Finally, the Latin American bloc has decided to funnel their energy into ending the practices of child marriage, FGM, while also lending support to the LGBTQ community.

General Assembly Resolutions on Sexual Rights in 21st Century

By: Diana Adi, Ethiopia

General Assembly is currently focusing on addressing sexual rights in the 21st century and working on resolutions. Ethiopia is working on a resolution with African, Latin, and some Asian countries such as, China and Japan. The resolution focuses on human trafficking, female genital mutilation and sexual minority groups. The African, Latin, and Asian blocs are focused on protecting women’s right and victims who have suffered from human rights violation across the globe. They also want to educate countries across the globe about women’s rights and they are urging other countries to work together in taking different actions against sexual rights violations and human trafficking.

The African, Latin, and Asian blocs acknowledged the dangers of female genital mutilation in their resolution. They are also affirming their commitment to the political declaration on the implementation of the United Nation Global Plan of Action that addresses the issue of human trafficking and the actions that have been implemented to reduce human trafficking across the globe. They are also supporting women advancement across the globe and also working on strengthening the different women international organizations. They also urge the international communities to focus on the increasing human trafficking of women and children, and the human rights violation against women.

A Day In The HCR: Consensus Is The Word

By: Taylor Dowler, Haiti

Member States in the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Executive Council have been working diligently these last few days  on drafting work papers and also on their ability to form consensus amongst themselves on a gambit of subjects. Upon first introduction to topic number one, on implementing the global compact on refugees, there were three main blocs that formed immediately on Friday evening. By Saturday at noon, they already had working papers merged into one, and moved out of general debate on the subject well before lunch time. As they moved into general debate on the topic of countering xenophobia, five blocs immediately formed before lunch. By two o’clock all the working papers had merged, and the entirety of the HCR was having a round table discussion to ensure they had complete consensus on the working paper they were preparing.

Several delegates asserted that the momentum from topic one followed into topic two. The delegate from the Central African Republic was thrilled by the level of international cooperation happening within the committee. She went on to say that the push back received by developing countries has helped immensely in the shaping of the working papers. While some delegates were reported to have been thrown by the allowances made, the general consensus among most HCR delegates appears to be exuberance over the high level of collaboration. Upon entering substantive debate on their first topic, only eight edits were proposed and all were deemed friendly by the main sponsors of the working paper.

Opinion

Addressing Human Rights, Security and Sustainable Development in Human Rights Council

By: Diana Adi, Ethiopia

Earlier today the Human Rights Council focused on their third topic: the intersection of human rights, security and sustainable development. Ethiopia was focusing on education,  security, and 15/17 sustainable goals. Ethiopia sponsored, with Iraq, a resolution that emphasized on the three topics of human rights, security, and sustainable development being looked at independently and emphasizing the details of the three topics. The resolution emphasizes the United Nation Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy which outlines the conditions which spread terrorism and also prevent terrorism. The resolution also supports the four pillars that are mentioned in the Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy: addressing the conditions that lead to terrorism, preventing terrorism, strengthening the United Nation’s role, and ensuring human rights are protected.

The resolution reaffirms the obligations that member states should settle disputes peacefully through having civil and peaceful conversations among communities in order to prevent violence. The resolution also urges the international communities, and international organizations to work together in advancing human rights, security and sustainable development by addressing the three pillars. The resolution also thanks member states for acknowledging  the intersection between human rights, security, and sustainable development by taking them into consideration when allocating aid. They also thank member states for promoting the advancement of human rights, security and sustainable development.